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Opioid Overdoses Are Up. Could Massage Help? [Guest Editorial] – Massage Magazine

Summary

I lost my dad, Fred, at the age of 58, to an opioid overdose after he had seven lower-body surgeries for injuries that he didn’t even need.

He had tried everything he possibly could do and was left with no choice but to start taking opioids for pain relief in 2014. The two-year demise and rapid destruction of his quality of life were brutal and disturbing to watch.

In 2016, he lost his battle to addiction and lost his life. It was a horrible day in which he coded …….

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I lost my dad, Fred, at the age of 58, to an opioid overdose after he had seven lower-body surgeries for injuries that he didn’t even need.

He had tried everything he possibly could do and was left with no choice but to start taking opioids for pain relief in 2014. The two-year demise and rapid destruction of his quality of life were brutal and disturbing to watch.

In 2016, he lost his battle to addiction and lost his life. It was a horrible day in which he coded eight times and became brain dead. I had to decide to pull him off life support. Watching him die was something that I will never forget and changed me for the rest of my life.

I went through a vast array of emotions, from sadness to intense anger, that this had happened at the hands of the medical system and continues to happen more frequently. Once my emotions settled down a few weeks later, I began to reflect on why all this happened and keeps happening at an alarming rate.

I went through the obvious culprits and played the blame game: Greedy doctors and Big Pharma completely disregarding human life and only caring about making money was one thought I had. I then went deeper and started to realize it was partially the patient’s fault as well, as they will do anything to get out of pain in the short term and not think about the long-term ramifications of that shortsighted approach.

Consider the latest data on drug-overdose deaths:

• Drug-overdose deaths increased a staggering 29.4 percent from 2019 to 2020, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

• In numbers, that means drug-overdose deaths increased from 72,151 in 2019 to 93,331 in 2020.

• Many people who become addicted to opioids begin in a medical doctor’s office with the hopes of relieving pain; according to the American Psychiatric Association, at least 2 million Americans develop a substance-abuse disorder related to prescription opioid pain medication.

The Chiropractor Who Does Not Adjust

I graduated with my chiropractic degree in 2011. I am not a typical chiropractor and am an outcast in my profession for the way I practice and treat.

I have never adjusted in my clinical practice and have focused only on delivering hands-on, soft-tissue-based treatments. Halfway through my schooling, I started questioning the validity of the adjustment and asked why we didn’t just focus on the soft-tissue portion because it’s what holds the bones in place. My teachers didn’t like that and told me to drop out of school “if you don’t believe in the true healing powers of chiropractic.”

I didn’t listen to them and instead focused on soft-tissue-specific treatments while doing everything I could to learn more. I did what I had to do to pass my boards, but to this …….

Source: https://www.massagemag.com/opioid-overdoses-are-up-could-massage-help-guest-editorial-131859/